Aldeburgh... fresh fish nearly every day
Local markets and home grown vegetables...
A Suffolk field of oil seed rape
Kombucha making
Grading and packing at Jolly Asparagus
Shimpling Park Farm lamb
Local tea rooms
Cooking over fire in my potjies
    Tuesday, 01 December 2020 18:01

    The Goatfather

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    The resilience of restaurants throughout the lockdowns and the ingenuity of proprietors just amazes me, none more so than the Get My Goat campaign from the lovely Justin and Jurga Sharp at Pea Porridge. For a start the marketing and humour from Justin, the Goatfather, is one of the best calls to action on social media I've seen for a while. Who could resist Bury'sGoatTalent and GoatWhisperer Justin's beautiful four course dinner? We ordered the middle eastern style, heat at home GoatToGo supper last week. It was phenomenal! Justin and Jurga are great advocates and supporters of Cabrito Goat, who source meat from British dairy farms and who supplied the kid goat meat for the four course menu. Not only was the menu fantastic, but the information sheet and serving instructions were superbly presented and included interesting information about the ingredients, and the cooking techniques used for each course. Plus exact reheating instructions - this is the kind of dinner that I enjoy. While the Goatfather mans the kitchen alongside award winning chef and flatbread maker extraordinaire, James Carn Pryor, Jurga ensures that the ordering, payment and collection of the GoatFest goes smoothly and will sell you some wine; it's good, buy it.  From Lowerland, Prieska. (the land of the lost 'She' goat) high altitude, hands- off naturally farmed grapes are made into complex wines. Loweland, Die Verlore Bokooi NV (red) and Lowerland, Die Wonde-Draai (white).  My goatness we are lucky in Bury St Edmunds.

    Get My Goat continues to be available each Thursday, Friday and Saturday at £55 for two people.

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    Tuesday, 01 December 2020 16:08

    Flam-kuche Flatpack

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    What's that I hear you say? The Amelie Flam-kuche flatpack is a new on-line, delicious, UK delivery ready meal, from father and son team Regis and Alex Crepy at Amelie Restaurant in Cambridge. Flammekeuche is a traditional Alsace dish, so think France meets Germany. It could be described as a skinny pizza, but it's rather more like an unleavened pastry or flatbread. Thin with crispy edges as it comes out of the oven and the perfect snack at any time of the day. You can choose the toppings when ordering your flatpack (which contains 4 bases and will keep for up to 4 days in the fridge) then it's a quick assembly job; which is also fun and easy for children to do, cook for six minutes in a very hot oven. Et Voila!

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    Wednesday, 25 November 2020 14:24

    Wild Meat - my treat

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    So the celebrities on I'm a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here aren't enjoying their food rations? Blimey, they've been sent squirrel, quail and hare all supplied by The Wild Meat Company in Suffolk. That's my idea of a perfect supper. Here's the wild venison from my last online order. Get your Christmas order in now!

    Monday, 23 November 2020 18:50

    Mellow Yellow - delicious Sandlings Saffron

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    In 1977 I went to work as a nanny for an Iranian family living in Oxford. I arrived on a Sunday evening ready to start work on the Monday. It was a cold November night and I was welcomed with the most delicious Ghormeh Sabzi served with Persian steamed rice. I discovered on this first night that rice would endlessly be cooked and turned out of the pan to great ceremony,with both the children’s mother and their granny competitively trying to achieve the perfect and fluffiest finish. The Persian steamed rice was always fragrant with saffron and glistening with butter. A raw egg, presented in an egg cup alongside a side dish of somagh were often placed on the table, ready for us to add to our own serving of rice. I hated that raw egg, but eventually became quite adept at quickly mixing it into the hot, steaming rice so that it scrambled slightly, losing its raw snottiness. My favourite rice was always the one served with a thick, golden crunchy crust of TahDig, (bottom of the pot) which formed when slowly steaming the rice over a layer of butter, or sometimes yoghurt and saffron. I was taught to make this and eagerly watched whenever it was made to make sure I had the best chance of perfecting it myself.

    sample

    Recently I was sent a pot of Sandlings Saffron to sample which is grown in Suffolk and when I opened the envelope containing the tin capsule the aroma hit me, instantly reminding me of those days working as a nanny. Persian rice therefore was my go-to recipe to test the pungency, colour and strength of this locally Orford grown saffron. Quantities were not important when I was taught to cook the rice, just the technique, which if followed should work for any amount that you decide to cook. It has for me over the years.  The best rice to use is a bog-standard long grain Basmati rice. Usually the cheapest bag in the supermarket that’s not ‘easy cook’ or if you check the cooking time on the packet is not a 10/15 minute quick cook rice. Generally any ethnic supermarket will have a good unadulterated Basmati. 

    • Soak the rice in cold water overnight or for at least a few hours if overnight is not practical.
    • Take a couple of pinches of saffron threads and pummel in a pestle and mortar, then steep in about half an egg cupful of boiling water until needed.
    • Rinse the soaked rice under cold running water until the water runs clear. 
    • Heat a large pan of boiling, unsalted water and stir in the rinsed rice. Stir only once or twice to stop the rice sticking to the bottom of the pan. Allow the rice to reach a rolling boil (and you might notice some grains and foam starting to float to the top) and cook it for 5 minutes. The grains should be softening on the outside but hard in the middle. 
    • Drain and rinse the rice again under cold running water.
    • Take a deep, heavy based pan, non-stick if you want to ensure the TahDig comes away in one piece. (It must be clean so don’t be tempted to use the pan that you’ve blanched the rice in unless it’s had a good wash.) 
    • Melt a couple of large knobs of butter in the bottom of the pan, enough that once melted it covers the bottom of the pan and is about 5mm deep. Add a splash of oil to the butter to prevent it from burning too quickly.
    • Once the butter is sizzling take the blanched, drained but still wet rice and carefully spoon it over the butter layer. Sprinkle with a little salt. 
    • Make about four holes with the handle of a wooden spoon and divide the soaked saffron between the holes, cover up with a little loose rice, hiding the saffron and forming a small mound with the rice in the saucepan. 
    • Wrap the lid of the pan in a clean tea towel and place the pan over a very low heat for an hour. The heat must be no more than the equivalent of a slow trembling simmer. Do not remove the lid or peep at the rice during this time.
    • After an hour turn off the heat and the rice is ready to serve. 
    • Turn out onto a large serving dish, admiring the crust (TahDig) that’s formed on the bottom and which was always the prized part of the rice.  You may need to encourage the TahDig to come away from the bottom of the pan, but hopefully it should come away in one piece.                                                                                                                                                                          

    The Sandlings Saffron was excellent and robust enough to flavour the rice and provide the pungency required to provide that saffron waft when turning out the rice. I’ve always been lucky enough to be sent Iranian saffron which I think is the best, but Suffolk’s doing very well indeed and I’d have this one in my store cupboard any day.

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    Tuesday, 17 November 2020 17:55

    Nigella - Cook, Eat, Repeat but carefully please

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    I liked the look of the fried chicken sandwich on last night's Nigella- Cook, Eat, Repeat but the level of the oil in her saucepan/deep fat fryer terrified me. I'm a wuss I know but one chicken thigh didn't need a cauldron of bubbling oil to fry it in. I was watching with fire blanket in hand. Anyway,who's going to clean out the pan, find somewhere to put the used oil and get rid of the lingering aromas of frying from the house? Give me my Tefal deep fat fryer that I operate in my outhouse anyday.

    Tuesday, 10 November 2020 11:43

    Hard or Soft Brexit?

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    How do you like your eggs in the morning? How do you want your Brexit? Lovely gift here for a disagreeing couple.

    Friday, 30 October 2020 17:16

    Brays Pork Pie

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    Just sorting through my photos and saw the Brays pork pie that we'd ordered during lockdown. It immediately made me fancy one, so I've ordered my Grandson one for his first birthday party next week. Ssshh, don't tell him!

    Thursday, 22 October 2020 14:45

    Cracking Good Walnuts!

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    There's a brilliant crop of walnuts on my next door neighbour's tree which happily hangs over into my garden. So I've been making Stilton and Walnut Crisps.

    Tuesday, 13 October 2020 17:58

    A Discovery Box

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    Forager's Kitchen at Blackthorpe Barn, Rougham are launching their new Discovery Box very soon. I was asked to test drive the home delivery service in August and it was like no other that I have tried before. The box of foodie goodies was delivered to my door and invited me to Explore, Discover and Enjoy. It was a real treat and included a range of artisan products, information about the producers (not all from Suffolk, so some unfamiliar, which I enjoyed) and introduced some new flavours, cooking methods & skills. Instructions and superb ingredients were included for me to create my own restaurant quality meal at home. A high quality printed magazine featured augmented reality videos giving instant and easy access to every element of the box. Quite a Discovery indeed!

    Tuesday, 13 October 2020 15:39

    Quinces

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    Two things I always make as soon as I get my hands on quinces are Membrillo and Quincemeat. Membrillo is the perfect give away treat, is delicious with cheese and costs a fortune if you have to buy it in the shops. Quincemeat provides a good build up for the festive season, and is a great excuse to eat mince pies in October. A note on preparing quinces - they are a bugger to peel, especially the small, wild knobbly ones so I cook mine whole for my membrillo recipe, then pull off the flesh. However if you have those show-offy perfect, plump quinces then it's easier to peel and core them first, which saves sieving them. The horrible little runt quinces I make into quince jelly to spread on my toast and to glaze fruit tarts.

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